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Nutrition and Hormonal Balance

  Good Morning,  Nutrition and Hormonal Balance As an acupuncturist in the area of fertility, I realize tha...

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Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Fantastic Fall: Coping with Dryness

 


Good Morning!

Fantastic Fall: Coping with Dryness

Dryness is a common problem in Autumn. Dryness can manifest as constipation, dry throat, dry skin, dry eyes, dry brittle hair, thirst, and lack of sweat. Most people do not drink enough fluids regularly, let alone in the Autumn. Spicy food can cause or worsen dryness. Be careful not to get stuck in the vicious cycle of craving the same food that makes your symptoms worse!

Below are some of the most popular and common herbal remedies for aliments of the lungs:

Coltsfoot Root, (Tussilago farfara) The mucilaginous property of the root makes it useful with lung problems, coughs, and intestinal upset. Coltsfoot is available in tincture, syrup, capsules and tea. The active ingredients are extracted from the dried leaves, root and flowers.

Ginkgo Biloba (Ginkgo Biloba) has been a staple with practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years to treat asthma, allergies, and coughs. Studies have shown that ginkgo can inhibit allergic response and scientists have isolated an active ingredient in ginkgo that has an anti-inflammatory effect.

Horehound, (Marrubium vulgare) can be considered whenever heavy, dry, mucus must be discharged from lungs and respiratory passages. Horehound is the botanical herb of choice due to its long history as a safe, reliable, and effective herbal cough remedy.

Licorice root (Glycyrrhiza uralensis) contains elements helpful for the adrenals and glands, inducing the adrenal cortex to produce more cortisone and aldosterone. It is thought to exhibit a mucosal protectant effect by beneficially interfering with gastric prostanoid synthesis and increasing both mucous production and regional blood flow. Very helpful in treating flu, colds, and lung congestion. It is also found in popular cough remedies. Due to the adverse reaction of licorice, many studies have been performed using the deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL) extract, which is free of glycyrrhizin and has had no significant reported adverse effects.

Lobelia, (Lobelia inflata) is used smoking cessation and to treat asthma and depression. The piperidine alkaloids (lobeline) are believed to be responsible for the mechanism of action. In vitro studies show that lobeline crosses the blood-brain barrier and has similar activity to nicotine, and stimulates the release of dopamine and norepinephrine. At low doses, lobelia has stimulant effects. There are several contraindications with this herb. Lobelia is known to cross into breast milk and should not be consumed by pregnant or nursing mothers. Adverse reactions included nausea, vomiting, sweating, cough, dizziness, bradycardia, hypertension, seizures, respiratory stimulation (low doses) or depression (high doses). Toxicity includes sinus arrhythmia, bundle branch block, diaphoresis, cardiovascular collapse, seizures, coma. Herb-Drug Interactions include nicotine. Lobelia may have additive effects when combined with nicotine-containing products, resulting in toxicity.

Mullein, (Verbascum thapsus)is an antispasmodic, which is rich in mucilage, a substance that soothes the throat. It is a good expectorant and, in the process of clearing out congestion. It also soothes irritation in the throat and bronchial passages. As an antispasmodic, mullein can relieve stomach cramps and help control diarrhea. Mullein is an age old remedy, which is specific for bronchitis with hard cough and soreness. It is also a herb for cold and congestion. The leaves and flowers are used to reduce mucous and stimulate coughing up of phlegm.

Nettle (Urtica dioica)had been known to reduce allergic reactions. Rich in iron, potassium and silicon, nettles combined with comfrey, mullein, or horehound can be used for asthma. 

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